How effective are child maintenance and associated policies at supporting separated families, encouraging family-based arrangements, reducing conflict and helping children and adults achieve better outcomes? And how does this differ by group?

Background

This encompasses priorities around:
- promoting financial resilience and reducing poverty, including by harnessing the full set of levers available through the Department and its public bodies, other government departments and Local and Combined Authorities
- supporting people to help meet the cost of living and work across government to support the formulation and delivery of effective housing policies, particularly with the Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities (DLUHC)
- delivering financial security for low-income working adults, and for children in low-income households

Next steps

Send correspondence and further questions to evidence.strategyteam@dwp.gov.uk.

Source

This question was published as part of the set of ARIs in this document:

DWP Areas of Research Interest 2023 GOV UK

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