What are the causes, consequences and costs associated with parental conflict and family breakdown? What is effective in avoiding or mitigating parental conflict and for whom? How do parental characteristics including worklessness, low skills, lack of stable housing, ethnicity, parents in the perinatal stage, LGBTQ+, being (or having been) a member of the armed forces, mental health and parents with SEND children interact with conflict and influence what works?

Background

This encompasses priorities around:
- promoting financial resilience and reducing poverty, including by harnessing the full set of levers available through the Department and its public bodies, other government departments and Local and Combined Authorities
- supporting people to help meet the cost of living and work across government to support the formulation and delivery of effective housing policies, particularly with the Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities (DLUHC)
- delivering financial security for low-income working adults, and for children in low-income households

Next steps

Send correspondence and further questions to evidence.strategyteam@dwp.gov.uk.

Source

This question was published as part of the set of ARIs in this document:

DWP Areas of Research Interest 2023 GOV UK

Related UKRI funded projects


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    Funded by: AHRC

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    Why might this be relevant?

    The project explores post-separation family life and shared residence, which partially addresses the question about parental conflict and family breakdown.

  • The Changing Nature of Lone Parenthood and its Consequences

    The increased number of lone-parent families is one of the most significant social trends to have occurred over the last thirty years. Today one-in-four children live in a lone-parent family compared to just one 1-in-20 ...

    Funded by: ESRC

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    Why might this be relevant?

    The project investigates the changing nature of lone parenthood and its consequences, which is relevant to the question about parental conflict and family breakdown.

  • Family Demography and Health in Low- and Middle-income Countries: A Cyberseminar Series Exploring Family Change and Intergenerational Relationships

    Intergenerational relations involve the exchange of material, instrumental, and emotional support across the life course. Parents are sources of support to their children but can become recipients of support, especially ...

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    Why might this be relevant?

    The project focuses on intergenerational relationships and support in low- and middle-income countries, which does not directly address the question about parental conflict and family breakdown.

  • A Parenting Team?

    By five years old, 25% of children in the UK will have experienced the separation of their parents (Understanding Society 2018). It has traditionally been assumed by the public and courts of law that mothers should recei...

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  • Family Values: A Liberal Egalitarian Theory of the Family

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  • Partner Relationships, Residential Relocations and Housing in the Life Course

    Partner relationships, residential relocations and housing are crucial to people's well-being and are known to be connected with each other. Many aspects of this connection, however, have remained under-researched or une...

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