How do the characteristics, needs and experiences of older workers vary in relation to work and health? What factors affect whether older workers continue in employment? What approaches work best to maximise employment options for older workers?

Background

This encompasses priorities around:
- supporting the economy and ensuring the UK’s long-term prosperity by delivering the Plan for Jobs
- ensuring that it pays to work, and supporting in-work progression
- supporting those facing barriers to work to reach their potential in the labour market via Sector-based Work Academy Programmes (SWAPs), In-Work Progression, support for older Jobseekers and the Youth Offer

Next steps

Send correspondence and further questions to evidence.strategyteam@dwp.gov.uk.

Source

This question was published as part of the set of ARIs in this document:

DWP Areas of Research Interest 2023 GOV UK

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