How can we minimise the harm to those engaging with the family justice system? What factors affect the effectiveness of Domestic Violence Protection Orders and other measures in the Domestic Abuse Bill?

Background

We want to improve the way people are supported in their interactions with the justice system, to target timely and efficient resolutions that lead to positive and sustainable outcomes for all parties involved.

Next steps

We can be contacted at the following email address: evidence_partnerships@justice.gov.uk.

Source

This question was published as part of the set of ARIs in this document:

Areas of research interest

Related UKRI funded projects


  • Domestic Abuse Proceedings In Family Courts: Overlap And Pathways In Private And Public Family Justice

    Domestic abuse proceedings in family courts are not studied at national level in England and Wales beyond basic national statistics. Until recently, research access to national family justice data has been restricted to ...

    Funded by: ESRC

    Lead research organisation: University of Bristol

    Why might this be relevant?

    The project focuses on domestic abuse proceedings in family courts and aims to improve the understanding of how people use protective measures, which directly relates to the question's focus on the effectiveness of Domestic Violence Protection Orders and other measures in the Domestic Abuse Bill.

  • Step Up - Building the Evidence Base for Early Intervention Responses for Children Living With Domestic Abuse

    This project aims to improve child protection responses for children and young people living with domestic violence by providing effective early help. It is based on a partnership between researchers at the University of...

    Funded by: ESRC

    Lead research organisation: University of Central Lancashire

    Why might this be relevant?

    The project aims to improve child protection responses for children living with domestic violence, which partially addresses the question's focus on minimizing harm to those engaging with the family justice system.

  • Understanding and improving risk assessment on domestic abuse cases

    Domestic violence is one of the most common forms of crime coming to the attention of the police. It can have severe and long-standing consequences. Yet our understanding of how to respond to domestic violence, despite v...

    Funded by: ESRC

    Lead research organisation: University of Manchester

    Why might this be relevant?

    The project seeks to improve risk assessment on domestic abuse cases, which is related to the question's focus on the effectiveness of protective measures in the Domestic Abuse Bill.

  • Domestic Abuse: Harnessing Learning Internationally under Covid-19

    There is considerable evidence that, both in the UK and globally, the risks of living with domestic violence and abuse (DVA) have increased consequent to Covid-19 restrictions. A range of responses at policy and practice...

    Funded by: ESRC

    Lead research organisation: University of Central Lancashire

  • Is the rate of domestic violence decreasing or increasing? A re-analysis of the British Crime Survey

    Is the rate of domestic violence going up or down? After over a decade of decline (1995-2009) the rate of domestic violence as reported by the British Crime Survey appears to have stabilised or started to increase. The B...

    Funded by: ESRC

    Lead research organisation: Lancaster University

  • Domestic Abuse: Responding to the Shadow Pandemic

    The eradication of violence against women is a global aim (UN SDG 16). Globally, pandemics notwithstanding, domestic abuse costs around$4.4 trillion a year or just over 5% of the annual global GDP (Hoeffler and Fearon 20...

    Funded by: ESRC

    Lead research organisation: University of Liverpool

  • Domestic violence perpetrator programmes: How do they respond to neurodiversity?

    The violence against women sector looks set to achieve a widely called for Perpetrator Strategy within the imminent Domestic Abuse Act in the UK. This will make it a statutory duty to fund perpetrator programmes to tackl...

    Funded by: ESRC

    Lead research organisation: Durham University

  • Prosecuting Domestic Abuse: Amplifying the Survivor's Voice in Neoliberal Times

    Domestic abuse accounts for nearly one in five CPS prosecutions. Women withdraw their support for the prosecution in one third of those cases (CPS, 2016). At the same time, the CPS regards domestic abuse offences as 'par...

    Funded by: ESRC

    Lead research organisation: University of Kent

  • Integrating the longitudinal study of intimate partner violence perpetration within life course criminology

    Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) is abusive behaviour between (ex)partners and is a serious problem in society. Almost 1 in 4 women and 1 in 10 men experience IPV at some point in their lives, whilst it is estimated that ...

    Funded by: ESRC

    Lead research organisation: Cardiff University

  • Developing the evidence base for innovation in social care for children and families affected by domestic abuse

    WHY DO WE NEED THIS STUDY? Children and young people who live with domestic abuse (DA) are at risk of a range of negative mental health, educational and social outcomes. Despite increasing recognition in recent years of ...

    Funded by: ESRC

    Lead research organisation: University of Stirling