What affects willingness to pay for news online? What types of content are different audience groups willing to pay for? In what ways are different audiences willing to pay (e.g. regular subscription, donation)? How does this change over time and what influences that change?

Background

The Media and Creative Industries directorate wants to probe and develop evidence for considering new funding approaches and business models across its sectors which can better ensure growth, social responsibility and environmental sustainability. As new challenges arise, it needs to develop a strong research evidence base to lead on policy and to support these sectors and their wider impacts.In terms of media, MCI needs to consider how best to support television, radio and the press sectors to adapt to the ever-changing media environment while maintaining a media which acts in the public interest and with social and environmental responsibility. The place of regulation and government intervention should be considered within this context. The UK has a reputation for the provision of a dynamic, strong, independent and safe sector where freedoms of speech and expression are supported. There will be a natural focus on the BBC over the coming years as MCI looks at the sustainability of BBC funding and prepares for the start of the next charter period in 2028.

Next steps

Get in touch with csa@dcms.gov.uk

Source

This question was published as part of the set of ARIs in this document:

DCMS areas of research interest GOV UK

Related UKRI funded projects


  • Multi-platform media and the digital challenge: Strategy, Distribution and Policy

    This project is about economic and social aspects of transformations taking place in the media industry as a result of digital convergence and growth of the internet. It sets out to analyse the recent migration of media ...

    Funded by: ESRC

    Lead research organisation: University of Glasgow

    Why might this be relevant?

    The project investigates the impact of digital convergence on the media industry, including the diversity of content and audience demands, which partially relates to the question about willingness to pay for online news.

  • Multiplatforming Public Service Broadcasting: The Specialist Factual Independent Production Ecology in the UK's Digital Television Landscape

    This project investigates the changing production ecology of the UK's independent specialist factual production sector in relationship to the role and future of public service broadcasting (PSB) in the emerging digital t...

    Funded by: AHRC

    Lead research organisation: Royal Holloway, University of London

    Why might this be relevant?

    The project investigates the changing production ecology of the UK's independent specialist factual production sector in relation to public service broadcasting, which could indirectly relate to the question about willingness to pay for online news.

  • The Shape of the Media: The Politics of Media Policy in the US and UK

    Media industries and flows play a vital role in private and public life around the world. Newspapers, magazines, television, radio, websites, music and film are valuable spheres of production and consumption, part of the...

    Funded by: AHRC

    Lead research organisation: Goldsmiths College

    Why might this be relevant?

    The project focuses on media policy debates in the UK and USA, but does not directly address the question about willingness to pay for online news.