Are younger people deferring car use or are many of them never going to become drivers, unlike older generations? Are social norms for younger age groups changing?

Background

The improve transport for the user strategic priority is critical in ensuring the department delivers and maintains a transport system that meets the needs of the public and addresses what they care about most. It puts the needs and expectations of current and potential users (both passengers and freight customers) at the heart of the operation of the transport system and considers about end-to-end journeys, not just individual transport modes. It is focused on ensuring that our infrastructure and the services which use it meet the varied needs of businesses and the public, are attractive, affordable, sustainable, and resilient is a crucial goal for the department.

Next steps

Get in touch with bridgetoresearch@dft.gov.uk

Source

This question was published as part of the set of ARIs in this document:

DFT-Areas of research interest 2023 GOV UK

Related UKRI funded projects


  • Helping Older Drivers continue driving safer for longer

    The research explores: what problems older people experience with the ability to continue driving safely as they get older; identifying the technologies that could potentially assist them to continue driving; proof of co...

    Funded by: EPSRC

    Lead research organisation: Newcastle University

    Why might this be relevant?

    The project is not relevant as it focuses on older drivers, not younger ones.

  • Pick & Mix: A mobility service for 16-25 year olds that outshine the car

    ‘Pick&Mix’ will be a mobility service for 16-25 year olds created by young people, for young people. It will be designed by a team of volunteers selected from the 620,000 members of Young Scot (the Scottish youth i...

    Funded by: Innovate UK

    Lead research organisation: ESP Systex Holdings Ltd

    Why might this be relevant?

    The project directly addresses the question by exploring a mobility service for young people that reduces the need for car ownership.

  • Life Transitions and Travel Behaviour

    The aim of the project is to assess how life transitions influence travel behaviour and to identify opportunities from this for policy interventions to achieve desirable transport outcomes. Life transitions (major change...

    Funded by: ESRC

    Lead research organisation: University of the West of England

    Why might this be relevant?

    The project partially addresses the question by studying how life transitions influence travel behavior, including car ownership.

  • A New Metric for the Assessment of Driver Crash Risks

    Road accidents account for thousands of deaths and injuries each year in Great Britain. Central to concerns for road safety are younger and older drivers who are reported to have crash rates per mile driven or per trip m...

    Funded by: EPSRC

    Lead research organisation: University of Essex

  • Modelling developmental trajectories of novice drivers with high and low crash liability

    Road traffic crashes are one of the greatest threats to public health, particularly for young people, with a substantial social and economic cost to society. Novice drivers are overrepresented in casualty statistics, wit...

    Funded by: ESRC

    Lead research organisation: University of Greenwich

  • Responsible Automation for Inclusive Mobility (RAIM): Using AI to Develop Future Transport Systems that Meet the Needs of Ageing Populations

    To capture the full social and economic benefits of AI, new technologies must be sensitive to the diverse needs of the whole population. This means understanding and reflecting the complexity of individual needs, the var...

    Funded by: ESRC

    Lead research organisation: University of Leeds