How accurate is the proven reoffending rate and how does it vary by different groups? How and why does reoffending vary by reoffending propensity?

Background

We want to address the causes of reoffending using personalised evidence, live data, and digital services to better target and sequence interventions. To do this we need to build the evidence base that can inform the development of more holistic measures than ‘proven reoffending’, factoring in a broader range of outcomes.

Next steps

We can be contacted at the following email address: evidence_partnerships@justice.gov.uk.

Source

This question was published as part of the set of ARIs in this document:

Areas of research interest

Related UKRI funded projects


  • Make Time Count Today - Reducing criminal reoffending on probation through data analytics, predictive behaviour recognition and optimised interventions

    **Problem Addressed** Crime costs UK economy over £58bn pa, with 1.2mn people convicted annually. Of these, 87% have previous convictions, 60% of released prisoners and 30% on probation reoffend within 12 months. ...

    Funded by: Innovate UK

    Lead research organisation: Make Time Count Today Ltd

    Why might this be relevant?

    The project focuses on reducing reoffending through data analytics and predictive behavior recognition, but does not directly address the accuracy of proven reoffending rates or how it varies by different groups.

  • Evaluating the long-term impact of Release on Temporary License (ROTL)

    Release on temporary licence (ROTL) provides eligible people currently in prison the opportunity to prepare for resettlement in the community through day or overnight release. The intended impact of ROTL is to reduce reo...

    Funded by: ESRC

    Lead research organisation: Queen Mary, University of London

    Why might this be relevant?

    The project evaluates the long-term impact of Release on Temporary License (ROTL) on reoffending, but does not specifically address the accuracy of proven reoffending rates or how it varies by different groups and reoffending propensity.

  • Enforced alcohol abstinence: does it reduce reoffending?

    Whilst there has been intense focus on illicit drugs and associated violence in crime policy in recent years, alcohol is used to a greater degree and implicated in many more crimes, especially those of violence. Courts a...

    Funded by: ESRC

    Lead research organisation: University of Liverpool

    Why might this be relevant?

    The project investigates the impact of enforced alcohol abstinence on reoffending, but does not directly address the accuracy of proven reoffending rates or how it varies by different groups and reoffending propensity.

  • Plymouth Community Justice Court: A Case Study of Problem Solving Interventions, Reducing Re-offending and Public Confidence

    The criminal justice system has over many years introduced a range of initiatives designed to reduce crime and support offenders in their efforts to desist from crime. One recent initiative, originating in the U.S.A and ...

    Funded by: ESRC

    Lead research organisation: University of Plymouth

  • ADR UK Data First Evaluation Fellowship

    Until recently, the large amounts of administrative data routinely collected about offenders as they are moved through the Criminal Justice System have been inaccessible to research. Instead, our understanding has largel...

    Funded by: ESRC

    Lead research organisation: University of Surrey

  • A multi-cultural comparative study into the influence national level variations have on desistance from crime

    NERC: Jessica Cleary: ES/P000681/1 Using qualitative interviews with participants involved in criminal justice interventions, collected in Québec (Canada) and Scotland prior to the exchange, this project will expl...

    Funded by: NERC

    Lead research organisation: University of Stirling

  • Regulating Justice: The Dynamics of Compliance and Breach in Criminal Justice Social Work in Scotland

    Not only does Scotland imprison more people than most European countries, but our prison numbers are also rising despite a fall in crime levels. The Scottish Government is attempting to reduce imprisonment through increa...

    Funded by: ESRC

    Lead research organisation: University of Strathclyde

  • Education and social care predictors of offending trajectories: An administrative data linkage study

    Criminal behaviour is a global public health problem associated with a wide range of poor health and social outcomes for victims and perpetrators. Such behaviour typically follows distinct pathways or trajectories, with ...

    Funded by: ESRC

    Lead research organisation: King's College London

  • Righting recidivism: unlocking the cognitive underpinnings of successful interventions to reduce reoffending

    Recidivism is one of the greatest socio-economic burdens the UK currently faces. At an estimated total cost of £18.1 billion a year, prison re-entry places a substantial burden on the national economy. This exacerb...

    Funded by: UKRI

    Lead research organisation: University of Kent

  • Distant Voices: Coming Home

    Distant Voices responds to pressing public policy and political challenges created by huge rises in the numbers of people subject to penal sanctions and by high levels of reoffending. Turning conventional understandings ...

    Funded by: ESRC

    Lead research organisation: University of Glasgow

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