The role and influence of the internet and social media in the radicalisation process and ways to intervene.

Background

More detailed research priorities for serious and organised crime can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/serious-and-organised-crime-home-office-research-priorities- april-2018-to-march-2021 ↩

Next steps

Get in touch with research@homeoffice.gov.uk

Source

This question was published as part of the set of ARIs in this document:

Areas of research interest relevant to the Home Office GOVUK

Related UKRI funded projects


  • Predicting online radicalisation

    RESEARCH CONTEXT An estimated 25,000 foreign fighters have been recruited to Islamic State (IS) from over 100 counties around the world. While shocking in itself, this reflects only the militant end-product of the radic...

    Funded by: AHRC

    Lead research organisation: University of Bath

    Why might this be relevant?

    The project focuses on predicting online radicalisation and developing software to analyse social media data related to extremism.

  • Real-Time Detection of Violence and Extremism from Social Media

    The explosive use of social media tools in recent years has turned them into a double-edged sword. On one hand, social media is viewed as a positive factor in Middle East revolutions. On the other hand, violence events s...

    Funded by: EPSRC

    Lead research organisation: Aston University

    Why might this be relevant?

    This project also focuses on detecting trends of violent radicalization and extremism from social media using a Bayesian modeling approach.

  • Constructing the illiberal citizen? Radicalisation prevention, counter-terrorism, and the media in the UK

    Counter-terrorism and radicalisation prevention policies are not peripheral discourses and practices that affect only certain individuals and spheres, but should be understood as instruments that have serious implication...

    Funded by: ESRC

    Lead research organisation: Loughborough University

    Why might this be relevant?

    The project investigates the role of media in the dissemination of new imaginaries of radicalisation and the effects of counter-radicalisation strategies, which partially answers the question about the role and influence of the internet and social media in the radicalisation process.

  • 'The Crime-Terror Nexus: Investigating the overlap between criminal and extremist practices, narratives and networks in Tripoli, Lebanon

    THE RELEVANCE OF OUR RESEARCH Tripoli, Lebanon's second city, has over the past eight years witnessed a significant increase in levels of violence. This mainly stems from the progressive merger of criminal and terrorist...

    Funded by: ESRC

    Lead research organisation: University of Oxford

  • Raven: to Locate and Identify Online Extremist Multimedia

    Exploitation of online social networks by terrorists and hate groups for propaganda, recruiting, and fund raising is a widely recognised national security problem. We propose an automated intelligent web crawling system ...

    Funded by: Innovate UK

    Lead research organisation: City, University of London

  • Communities as defeating and/or endorsing extreme violence: how do communities support and/or defeat extreme violence over time?

    Communities, their connections and associated complexities, have been the subject of considerable conversation and debate in the UK, particularly since the terrorist attacks of 7 July 2005 and the English riots of 2011. ...

    Funded by: AHRC

    Lead research organisation: University of Birmingham

  • Reframing Muslim 'Radicalism'

    This study aims to assess Western policy responses to the threat of global jihadi ideology, and to develop a suitable methodology for making them more effective. Since 9/11, the ideological threat from global jihadism...

    Funded by: ESRC

    Lead research organisation: University of Oxford

  • 'Extremism and Its Support: Developing More Effective Policy Responses'

    Recent years have seen a resurgence of interest in extremism, though mainly al-Qaeda or 'AQ'-inspired terrorism. This emphasis on preventing violent extremism (PVE), and countering processes of radicalization within Musl...

    Funded by: ESRC

    Lead research organisation: University of Nottingham

  • Centre for Research and Evidence on Security Threats (CREST)

    In his recent CaSE speech, the UK Government Chief Scientific Adviser reported that 63% of the government's challenges have solutions rooted in the behavioural and social sciences. In the area of national security, it is...

    Funded by: ESRC

    Lead research organisation: Lancaster University

  • Covid-19: What are the Drivers of the Islamophobic Infodemic Communications on social media

    There is a direct gap in understanding how conspiracy theories and miscommunication on social media sites is being used to create a Covid-19 'infodemic'. This is particularly relevant in the context of Muslim communities...

    Funded by: ESRC

    Lead research organisation: Birmingham City University

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