How is climate change affecting the emergence and transmission of infectious diseases, and how can we become more resilient to these outbreaks?

Background

Adaptation and resilience: Defra is the lead government department for climate adaptation, responsible for the assessment of appropriate action to protect and enhance natural and human systems in a changing climate. Also, for increasing resilience and mitigating against risk. Such assessment is used in many areas, including for the statutory requirement of the Climate Change Act to produce a 5-yearly, “Climate Change Risk Assessment (CCRA) and National Adaptation Programme (NAP)”.

Although Defra has overarching responsibility for producing the CCRA and is responsible for managing several climate risks (such as impact on the natural environment), a number of climate risks (such as the impact on transport, health, business) are the responsibility of other government departments (for example Department for Transport (DfT), Department for Health (DfH), Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS), Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government (MHCLG).

Next steps

Get in touch with ari.comment@go-science.gov.uk

Source

This question was published as part of the set of ARIs in this document:

DEFRA Research and innovation interests GOVUK

Related UKRI funded projects


  • Risk assessment of the impact of climate change on human health and well-being

    Assessment of the potential impact of future climate change on human health and well-being (the latter via effects on animal health) is hindered by the sheer number of pathogens, their diversity, varied linkages to clima...

    Funded by: NERC

    Lead research organisation: University of Liverpool

    Why might this be relevant?

    The project focuses on assessing the impact of climate change on human and animal health by analyzing pathogens and their linkages to temperature and moisture levels, which directly relates to the question's focus on climate change and infectious diseases.

  • New methods for tracking emergent infections: integrating pathogen genomic and geographic information system data

    The rise of emerging infectious diseases during the past 50 years constitutes a major global public health and economic problem, and is due in part to globalization, displacement of indigenous populations and alterations...

    Funded by: MRC

    Lead research organisation: University of Oxford

    Why might this be relevant?

    The project is relevant as it investigates the impact of ecological variables on the emergence and spread of pathogens, which is related to the question's focus on climate change and infectious diseases.

  • COVID 19 - Improving COVID-19 forecasts by accounting for seasonality and environmental responses

    Policy-makers urgently need medium- and long-term forecasts for SARS-CoV-2, but we are currently ignorant of the virus' seasonal dynamics. In the absence of data, forecasters have been forced to assume that SARS-CoV-2 wi...

    Funded by: NERC

    Lead research organisation: Imperial College London

    Why might this be relevant?

    The project is relevant as it explores the relationship between SARS-CoV-2 transmission rates, seasonality, and environmental factors, which aligns with the question's focus on climate change and infectious diseases.

  • Improving projections for the future of bluetongue and its vectors under scenarios of climate and environmental change

    How will climate change affect the diseases that threaten our health and food security? We have good reason to believe that climate change will cause a number of infectious diseases to spread to new places or occur more ...

    Funded by: BBSRC

    Lead research organisation: Lancaster University

  • Immunity at the population level: understanding the effects of environmental change

    One consequence of environmental change that is especially hard to predict is the way that infectious diseases will respond to a different climate. This is important not only for people but also for most animals and plan...

    Funded by: NERC

    Lead research organisation: Queen Mary, University of London

  • Understanding zoonotic disease risk using dynamic ecological models

    The natural world is expected to undergo a significant transformation over the next century, driven by climate change, habitat destruction, human population increase and greater globalisation. Many diseases, such as Ebol...

    Funded by: MRC

    Lead research organisation: Zoological Soc London Inst of Zoology

  • Past epidemics as predictors of disease evolution over space and time

    Past epidemics as predictors of disease evolution over space and time The Earth's climate is changing: temperatures are rising and freak weather events, such as floods, droughts and heat waves, are becoming more frequen...

    Funded by: NERC

    Lead research organisation: University of Stirling

  • MRC Centre for Outbreak Analysis and Modelling Renewal

    The threat from new infectious diseases has been highlighted in recent years by the 2003 SARS epidemic, H5N1 'bird flu' and the 2009 H1N1 flu pandemic. Preparing for such eventualities is a priority for public health age...

    Funded by: MRC

    Lead research organisation: Imperial College London

  • 21-EEID US-UK Collab: Long-Distance Dispersal and Disease Spread Under Increased Ecological Complexity

    This project will focus upon infectious pathogens that have the capacity to transmit infection over a long distance. We will explore how this long distance spread is affected by a range of different characteristics that ...

    Funded by: BBSRC

    Lead research organisation: University of Warwick

  • US-UK Collab Linking models and policy: Using active adaptive management for optimal control of disease outbreaks.

    In the event of an outbreak of an infectious disease, management strategies to control further spread of infection are generally implemented based either upon strategies employed during previous epidemics or a pre-concei...

    Funded by: BBSRC

    Lead research organisation: University of Warwick

Similar ARIs from other organisations